Wireless & Telecom Regulatory Compliance for Top 5 African Economies

This africa-flag-mappost is an overview of the wireless and telecom compliance requirements for the 5 largest population countries in Africa.  As with any electrical product compliance issue, regulations can change rapidly, so check in with MET’s Global Market Access Group for the latest requirements.

Nigeria
The most populous country in Africa, Nigeria accepts EU R&TTE Directive reports and CE Declarations of Conformity (DoCs) as proof of compliance.

  • Required: Local company representative, regulatory marking
  • Not required: Product test samples

Certificates have no expiration date, but they must be updated if the approved product is modified.

The Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC) website is available in English.  It lists what categories of telecom and wireless technologies are affected.

Ethiopia
The 2nd most populous country in Africa, Ethiopia accepts FCC grants and test reports or EU R&TTE Directive reports and CE DoCs as proof of compliance.

  • Not required: Product test samples, local company representative, and regulatory marking

Certificates have no expiration date, but they must be updated if the approved product is modified.

The Ministry of Communication and Information Technology (MCIT) website is available in English.  It lists what categories of telecom and wireless technologies are affected.

Egypt
The 3rd most populous country in Africa, Egypt has compliance requirements for EMC, health and safety, wireless, and telecom.  The National Telecommunication Regulatory Authority (NTRA) accepts EU R&TTE Directive reports as proof of compliance.

  • Required: Product test samples (telecom only)
  • Not required: Local company representative

Certificates have no expiration date, but they must be updated if the approved product’s critical components are modified.

The NTRA website is available in English.  It includes information on type approvals and categories of products covered.

Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)
The 4th most populous country in Africa, DRC accepts FCC grants and test reports or EU R&TTE Directive reports as proof of compliance.

  • Required: Local company representative
  • Not required: Product test samples, regulatory marking

Certificates are valid for 10 years, assuming no change to the product.

The Congolese Post and Telecommunications Agency website is in French only and has limited information.

Note: The U.S. government places some restrictions on certain ‘dual-use’ (military and non-military application) technologies for export to DRC.

South Africa
The 5th most populous country in Africa, South Africa accepts FCC grants and test reports or EU R&TTE Directive reports and CE DoCs as proof of compliance.

  • Required: Local company representative, regulatory marking
  • Not required: Product test samples

Certificates have no expiration date, but they must be updated if the approved product is modified.

The Independent Commissions Authority of South Africa (ICASA) website is available in English.  It provides information on relevant regulations and certification programs.

Our dedicated Homologations Team and extensive network of international labs can help you get your products certified in over 65 countries.  Contact Us today for a free quotation or to ask a question.

To learn more about gaining approvals to sell your product around the world, register for a free webinar on Global Market Access.

1 Comment on Wireless & Telecom Regulatory Compliance for Top 5 African Economies

  1. Simon Hoffe Simon Hoffe

    Greetings,

    I find this blog very informative.

    In terms of South African compliance, it is worth mentioning the NRCS – National Regulator of Compulsory Standards – http://www.nrcs.org.za/. They take an interest in everything that connects to the mains, wireless or not, and will want copies of applicable IEC or SANS (not EN) test reports, as they require – see http://www.nrcs.org.za/content.asp?subID=54.

    Their Letter Of Authority certificates are only valid for 3 years.

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